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College of Law

Florida State University

 

Administrative Law & Governmental Relations Courses

The following courses are offered in the area of Administrative Law and Governmental Relations. Not all courses on this list are offered on a regular basis. You must consult the current course list and plan your schedule accordingly.

  • Administrative Law

    (3-4 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    A study of the legislative, executive, and judicial control of administrative action. The course includes discussion of formal and informal administrative processes, the opportunity to be heard, adequacy of notice, restrictions on the deciding body, and appellate review. 

  • Antitrust Law

    (2-3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    A study of judicial decisions construing and applying the federal antitrust laws ( i.e., Sherman, Clayton, Robinson-Patman, and Federal Trade Commission Acts) to the control of the competitive process in the American economy.

  • Clean Air Act

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    Through the study of cases, agency guidance documents, scholarly writings, and current events, we will explore a range of technical issues, legal issues, and policy questions relating to air pollution control, the Clean Air Act and its amendments, and the regulatory programs and activities conducted pursuant to its many provisions. The key objective of the course is for students to attain general competence in the history, major programs, and policy considerations relating to the Clean Air Act and its implementation in the United States. Students will apply theoretical and analytical tools, acquire technical knowledge, gain familiarity with case law and case studies, and analyze topics of interest in preparation for writing an original research paper or completing a final examination at the end of the semester. 

  • Consumer Law

    (2-3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    A study and analysis of decisional and statutory materials dealing with problems in areas such as consumer credit, deceptive and oppressive sales practices, extrajudicial collection efforts and the role of credit reporting agencies. 

  • Current Issues in Environmental Law & Policy Seminar

    (3 credits) 

    This seminar will cover important and timely issues in environmental law.  For example, the seminar may include discussion of issues that relate to various aspects of climate change adaptation and mitigation, the BP spill, and compliance with the environmental laws.  Students will be expected to write a paper that will enable them to fulfill the upper level writing requirement, in addition to other course requirements. 

  • Cyber Law

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    This is a seminar covering some of the legal issues that have arisen with the growth of the Internet. Topics examined will include e-commerce, intellectual property, crime on the Internet, first amendment, privacy, tort liability, and others. Each of these topics will be explored through the lens of a series of jurisprudential themes: What are the appropriate metaphors for conceptualizing cyberspace? Is there any role for law in regulating speech and conduct in cyberspace, or will social norms suffice? If law has a role in cyberspace, are traditional legal doctrines and categories adequate? If traditional doctrines and categories are inadequate, which legal institutions are the best to implement the changes this new technology requires--courts, legislatures, or administrative agencies? 

  • Cybersecurity Law

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    This skills training course introduces students to federal and state regulations on cybercrime, cyberespionage, and cyberwar. Topics covered in the course include:  consumer privacy protection; security protection responsibility of business entities, including disclosure requirements about privacy policies and cybersecurity breaches and employer monitoring and surveillance of employee computer activities; the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA); the Electronic Communications Protections Act (ECPA); and privacy and cybersecurity regulations of the Federal Trade Commission, Department of Health and Human Services, and the Federal Communications Commission.

  • Disability Law

    (3 credits)

    This course examines a variety of aspects of disability, including: the legal and policy framework underpinning federal law prohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability; the legal and social implications of having a disability; and entitlement programs. Particular emphasis will be on the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Fair Housing Act, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. This course will also examine entitlement and social insurance programs (eg. Social Security and Medicaid/Medicare), the ideas of “capacity” and “competence” as legal constructs and the implication of federal healthcare policy decisions on people with disabilities.

  • Education Law

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    This course examines a variety of legal issues surrounding American public education. It covers such topics as the right to a public education, the role of religion in public schools, student rights, the implications of the equal protection clause for education, teachers' rights and responsibilities, and students with disabilities. 

  • Election Law

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    This course surveys the legal regulation of elections and politics. Topics include the individual's right to participate in the political process, redistricting and the distribution of electoral power, the role of race in the regulation of politics, political party regulation and campaign finance reform. 

  • Employment Discrimination

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    Review of various statutes and executive orders governing employment discrimination on the basis of sex, race, age, religion, color, national origin, and sexual preference. Emphasis is on the policy implications derived from case analysis. 

  • Employment Law Survey

    (3-4 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    Survey of basic legal and policy concepts governing the employment relationship. 

  • Environmental Law

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    This course will introduce you to the core statutes, regulations, and common law principles that control humans’ impacts on environmental resources, including air, water, and soil. Environmental statutes are difficult to understand without context, so we will discuss the structure and interpretation of two statutes—the Clean Water Act and Clean Air Act—in depth. By the end of the course, you will understand how to identify whether a stationary source is a “major” source of air pollution under the Clean Air Act and therefore requires a certain type of permit, whether a wetland into which a pollutant is discharged counts as “waters of the United States” under the Clean Water Act (and why this matters), and many other core components of these Acts. We will also discuss the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (governing waste handling and disposal) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (governing the clean-up of hazardous waste sites), and we will briefly address the National Environmental Policy Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, and the Endangered Species Act as well as basic Administrative Law principles.

  • Florida Administrative Litigation

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisites: Evidence

    This is a skills based course that is designed to teach students how to prepare for and try Chapter 120 administrative procedure act cases in Florida.  Students will be exposed to all aspects of administrative litigation and will provide an understanding both academically, and practically of the intricacies involved with such litigation.  The course will showcase the roles of attorneys, witnesses, expert witnesses, the Administrative Law Judge, and state agencies in administrative litigation.  

    The material will be taught by lecture and example, and role playing as advocates in a mock litigation setting.  Such instruction will range from, and include, conducting depositions, drafting an administrative complaint, and culminating in a mock final hearing and the drafting of a proposed recommended order.  Students will be grouped into opposing teams, but each is responsible for his/her own written work product.

  • Florida Administrative Practice

    (2-3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    A study of the Florida Administrative Procedure Act (APA) and its interpretation by the courts. Major emphasis is placed on theories of delegation to administrative agencies, points of entry to obtain administrative review, and the relationship between the roles of administrative law judges, agency heads, and reviewing courts. Topics covered include the non-delegation doctrine, adjudication, non-rule policy, attorneys' fees, rule-making, rule challenges, bid protests, the statement of regulatory costs, judicial review, and formal legislative oversight. 

  • Florida Constitutional Law

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    A study of general principles of the Florida Constitution. Course covers individual rights, allocations and limitations concerning branches and levels of state government, state and local government finance and taxation powers, and judicial interpretation in Florida case law. 

  • Florida Legislative Practice: From Bill Drafting to the Governor’s Desk

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    This skills based course will train students on the fundamentals of the legislative process specifically as it relates to drafting, debating and passage of legislation. Corollary studies will include bill analysis and the committee and amendatory process. Constitutional and statutory provisions as well as rules the legislature has enacted relating to bill drafting and analysis will also be covered. Students will engage in practical exercises including: mock committee debates; bill and amendment analysis and drafting. This course will be useful for students interested in working in the Florida Legislature, in state agencies, and in the legislative office of the Governor. It will also be valuable for students interested in working in lobbying firms and as in-house counsel for companies with active legislative agendas.

  • Florida Legislative Practice: The Budget and Appropriations Process

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    This class will focus on the State of Florida’s budgeting and appropriations processes and requirements, including the roles of each branch of government, but with a focus on the Florida Legislature’s role and responsibilities. When the Legislature will be in session, expect to attend a budget-related meeting during the semester. Constitutional requirements, statutory processes, and agency/branch policies will be covered; as will the interplay between budgeting and policymaking in both planning and implementation. Comparisons of Florida to other states will be included. This course will be useful for students interested in working in the Florida Legislature, in state agencies, in lobbying firms, and in the Governor’s Office. It will also be valuable for students interested in working as in-house counsel for companies with active legislative agendas. This is a skills-training class.

  • Gambling & Pari-Mutuel Law

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    The class will present a detailed look at gambling laws which impact Floridians. The course will focus on Florida statutes, rules and interpretive court and administrative rulings which define the boundaries of legalized gambling in our state. An overview of federal law and its impact on gambling in Florida will also be discussed. 

  • Global Health & Pharmaceutical Law Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    Global sales of pharmaceuticals total more than $600 billion annually, with the United States constituting the world’s largest pharmaceutical market. This course addresses legal regulation of the pharmaceutical sector, from research and development to manufacturing and distribution. The principal focus is on U.S. law, including the FDA regulatory system. In addition, the course examines foreign regulation, such as the European pharmaceutical regulatory system, and the role of multilateral agencies, including the World Health Organization. 

  • Growth Management

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    Whereas zoning and subdivision law focuses on where different land uses are permitted and under what conditions, growth management law focuses on the timing and dimensions of urban growth, particularly at the periphery of urban centers where suburban and rural land uses meet. This course provides a survey of growth management law as applied in many parts of the nation, using Florida as a policy case study. The first part of the course focuses on four major topics: urban sprawl; urban redevelopment; state and regional controls; and environmental regulation. The second segment of the course examines Florida’s growth management regime through a historical and policy lens, focusing on techniques such as concurrency, urban growth boundaries, ecological and rural land acquisition, affordable housing initiatives and impact fees. 

  • Health Law and Policy

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    This course studies legal issues related to the organization and delivery of healthcare. It examines regulation of health care professionals, organizational providers, and those involved in financing health care delivery. Topics include duties of individuals and organizations involved in healthcare delivery, regulation of the interaction of these entities, and the impact of financing arrangements on the delivery of healthcare. 

  • Health Reform Seminar

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    The health care enterprise consists of an array of services and products intended to prevent, diagnose, treat, and conduct research on medical ailments. This enterprise encompasses preventive interventions, acute and chronic diagnostic services and treatment delivered in both inpatient and outpatient settings, biomedical and behavioral research, institutional and community-based long-term care, and mental health and addiction services. The American health care enterprise consists of participants drawn from the governmental, private not-for-profit, and proprietary (for-profit) sectors. The primary, tripartite goal of the health care enterprise is to deliver high quality health care services that are affordable and accessible to the public. This seminar will explore the ways in which recent federal and state legal and programmatic developments, as well as initiatives mounted by private actors (such as insurance companies, health care corporations, and employers), are likely to impact the accomplishment of the quality/affordability/access goal. At the federal level, main emphasis will be placed on the Affordable Care Act and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Following several class sessions during which students will discuss background material, the bulk of the seminar will consist of students preparing individual written papers on topics of their selection and making class presentations based on those papers. 

  • Information Privacy Law

    (2 credits)
    Prerequisites: None.

    This course will examine U.S. data privacy law, including core concepts, key laws, regulations, FTC enforcement actions, and leading cases.  To the extent possible, it will also cover state data privacy laws.  Topics covered include the intersection of informa-tion privacy, technology and the law, social media, government records, consumer data and business records, government access to private sector records, and data security law.  International data privacy law may be brought in to class discussions.

    The course will be offered via synchronous and asynchronous distance education using videoconferencing, online chat, pre-taped video lectures, Skype and discussion boards. 

  • Insurance Law

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    This course covers basic legal principles and their applicability to insurance generally. Construction of contracts, government supervision, insurance practice and litigation, and industry organization are reviewed. 

  • Land Use Regulation

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    This course, which will be offered only as an online course during Spring 2016, will address legal and regulatory issues that arise during the process of developing land in certain ways, such as for residential, retail, office or other land uses. It will focus on Florida but will also address issues from other states. Students will learn about the processes that landowners and developers follow to obtain local or state government approval for a project, such as applying for revisions to comprehensive plans, re-zonings, development orders, special use permits, variances, subdivision approvals, and development agreements. Students will also learn how state and local governments--again, with a focus on Florida--regulate land use and review land use and development applications. The course will also address resource-based issues associated with land development, including historic, cultural, and natural resources. Finally, students will learn about private land use controls, such as covenants, conditions, and restrictions, used to further regulate projects and build and preserve property values. 

    This will be an online only course, and it will be open to students at any accredited law school within the United States. Students will have weekly reading assignments, and they will be required to watch weekly lectures that explore these reading assignments. The course will be asynchronous, meaning that lectures will be available online for students to view at their convenience each week; students may choose any time of the week to watch the lectures. At the end of each week, students will be required to electronically submit responses to questions posed by the professor to demonstrate that they have done the readings and watched the lectures. Students’ viewing of the online lectures will be monitored in order to verify attendance. A portion of students’ grades will be based on students’ responses to questions, and the remaining portion of the grade will be based on a final open-book exam, which students will take remotely (from their home computers, for example).

    Students who are not enrolled in FSU College of Law must register with FSU in order to take the course and must obtain permission from their school if they wish to receive credit for the course at their school. 

     

  • Local Government Law

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    The powers, limitations, and special legal rules concerning local governments are studied. Emphasis is given to Florida problems concerning counties, cities, and special districts. 

  • Risk, Public Policy & Law

    (3 credits)

    This seminar will focus on how concepts of risk serve to justify and shape public policies, legal rules, and risk management practices. It will introduce some of the primary methods for analyzing potentially risky policies and managing risk. We will begin with a focus on the definition of risk as it applies to public policy, and as it has been used to analyze and inform policies and laws designed to address risks. We will then turn to the differences between formal assessments of risk and the “perceived risks” and social, political and institutional responses that typically drive public policy. These concepts will then be applied to a set of specific cases in current public policies that involve the intersection of environmental, energy, natural disaster, and security concerns.

  • Seminar on Constitution Revision

    (3 credits)
    Prerequisites: None

    This seminar will focus on the possible revision and reform of the Florida Constitution.  This is in part to begin preparation for the Constitution Revision Commission that will meet in 2017 - 2018. That Commission made up of 37 appointed members has the opportunity to place on the ballot recommendations for reform and revision and those do not have to be approved by the Legislature. The Seminar will be a 3 credit hour paper course with assigned readings and class presentations for each class. The papers are expected to be of publishable quality and may be submitted to the Revision Commission when it is organized.