[*] President, The Florida State University, 1994-Present. President, American Bar Association, 1991-92. Dean, FSU College of Law, 1984-1989; Faculty Member, 1989-Present. Chairman, Florida Commission on Ethics, 1974-1975. Member, Florida House of Representatives, 1966-1972. B.A., University of the South, 1955; J.D., University of Florida School of Law, 1961. Return to text.

[1] See infra Appendix 1 (showing per capita government spending for legal services). The United States spends approximately 12% percent of what England and Wales spend on civil indigent legal services. Return to text.

[2] Earl Johnson, Jr., The Right to Counsel in Civil Cases: An International Perspective, 19 LOY. L.A. L. REV. 341, 345 (1985); see also ACCESS TO JUSTICE WORKING GROUP, ST. BAR OF CAL., AND JUSTICE FOR ALL: FULFILLING THE PROMISE OF ACCESS TO CIVIL JUSTICE IN CALIFORNIA 6 (1996) [hereinafter AND JUSTICE FOR ALL]. Justice Johnson was the chair of the Access to Justice Working Group. Return to text.

[3] See ACCESS TO JUSTICE SUBCOMM., AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION CONSORTIUM ON LEGAL SERVICES AND THE PUBLIC, EQUAL JUSTICE IN THIS CENTURY: WHAT AMERICA CAN DO TO MAKE ACCESS TO JUSTICE A REALITY FOR THE COMMON CITIZEN BEFORE THE END OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 2 (1993) [hereinafter EQUAL JUSTICE IN THIS CENTURY]. Justice Johnson was the chair of the Access to Justice Subcommittee. Return to text.

[4] See id. Return to text.

[5] In re Amendments to Rules Regulating The Florida Bar—1-3.1(a) and Rules of Judicial Administration—2.065 (Legal Aid), 573 So. 2d 800, 806 (Fla. 1990). This opinion eventually led to a unique comprehensive access to justice plan calling for a greater awareness of the demand for legal services and for innovative solutions to satisfy that demand. Return to text.

[6] Id. at 804. Return to text.

[7] Id. at 806-07. Return to text.

[8] Id. at 806. Return to text.

[9] See In re Amendments to Rules Regulating The Florida Bar—1-3.1 and Rules of Judicial Administration—2.065 (Legal Aid), 630 So. 2d 501 (Fla. 1993). Return to text.

[10] For example, the court held that some government lawyers are prohibited from participating in the Florida Pro Bono Plan. See id. at 504. Further, the court simplified the reporting statement requirements. See id. at 505. Finally, the court held that lawyers licensed to practice in Florida, but who reside and practice out of state, are not excluded from their responsibility to provide legal services. See id. They can fulfill their obligation in the state in which they practice or reside. See id. Return to text.

[11] Id. at 503. Return to text.

[12] When Texas proposed a mandatory pro bono program the debate was very heated, with supporters rallying behind either a purely voluntary or a mandatory pro bono program. See Charles Herring, Jr., Isn't it Time for Mandatory Pro Bono? Plan Would Help Bar's Image—and Meet the Needs of the Poor, TEX. LAW., Aug. 13, 1990, at 18; Michael J. Mazzone, Mandatory Pro Bono: Slavery in Disguise, TEX. LAW., Oct. 22, 1990, at 22; Charles Herring, Jr., A Response to the Pro Bono Critics, TEX. LAW., Sept. 24, 1990, at 2. Return to text.

[13] See R. REGULATING FLA. BAR 4-6.1(b). Return to text.

[14] See id. Return to text.

[15] See id. (requiring that members of the Florida Bar render pro bono legal services and other pro bono service activities that relate directly to the legal needs of the poor). Return to text.

[16] See In re Amendments to Rules Regulating the Florida Bar—1-3.1(a) and Rules of Judicial Administration—2.065 (Legal Aid), 598 So. 2d 41, 54 (Fla. 1992). Return to text.

[17] Amos 5:24 (Revised Standard). Return to text.

[18] See LEGAL SERV. CORP., NUMBER OF POOR AND POVERTY RATE, BY STATE 1 (1997) [hereinafter POOR AND POVERTY RATE] (on file with FLA. ST. U. L. REV., Tallahassee, Fla.). Return to text.

[19] See THE FLA. BAR FOUND., LEGAL NEEDS AMONG LOW-AND MODERATE-INCOME HOUSEHOLDS IN FLORIDA 54 (1995) (finding that only 19% of low income legal needs were represented by lawyers). Return to text.

[20] See POOR AND POVERTY RATE, supra note 18, at 1 (illustrating there are approximately 700,000 more Florida residents in poverty in 1995 from 1989). Return to text.

[21] See EQUAL JUSTICE IN THIS CENTURY, supra note 3, at 3. Return to text.

[22] See id. Return to text.

[23] See, e.g., RICHARD A. POSNER, OVERCOMING LAW 53-54 (1995) (stating that, in his opinion, federally funded legal services are merely a method of advancing the interests of the legal services cartel). Notably, legal services lawyers often forego lucrative law firm job offers to earn starting salaries of $16,000 to $20,000 as they serve the interests of poor citizens. Return to text.

[24] See LEGAL SERV. CORP., LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION FACTS 1996 11 (1997). Return to text.

[25] See id. at 1. Return to text.

[26] See THE FLA. BAR FOUND., IOTA LEGAL ASSISTANCE FOR THE POOR ANNOTATED REPORT ii (1995) [hereinafter FLORIDA IOTA REPORT]. Return to text.

[27] See id. at viii. Return to text.

[28] See Dan Blaz, A Historic Republican Triumph: GOP Captures Congress; Party Controls Both Houses For First Time Since 50's, THE WASH. POST, Nov. 9, 1994, at A1. Return to text.

[29] See LEGAL SERV. CORP., LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION APPROPRIATION HISTORY 2 (1997) [hereinafter APPROPRIATION HISTORY]. Return to text.

[30] See id. at 1. In 1991, the Board of the Legal Services Corporation voted to ask for an increase of 50% funding, to the level of $525 million, simply to return the program to the level that existed a decade ago. Interview with Kent Spuhler, Executive Director, Florida Legal Services, Inc., in Tallahassee, Fla. (Dec. 22, 1997). Return to text.

[31] See POOR AND POVERTY RATE, supra note 18, at 1. Return to text.

[32] See APPROPRIATION HISTORY, supra note 29, at 1. Return to text.

[33] This contrasts with 25 lawyers for every 10,000 people in the general population. See EQUAL JUSTICE IN THIS CENTURY, supra note 3, at 4. Return to text.

[34] In 1997, there were 36.5 million people living in poverty. See LEATHA LAMISON- WHITE, U.S. BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, CURRENT POPULATION REPORTS, SERIES P60-198, POVERTY IN THE UNITED STATES: 1996 v (1997). Assuming approximately $40,000 per lawyer for salary and benefits, the total costs for legal services lawyers would be $292 million. Further, assuming an overhead of 40% to pay for office staff, facilities, equipment, and the like, the minimum federal funding to achieve two lawyers for every 10,000 individuals living in poverty is $410 million. Return to text.

[35] Again, assuming 2.3 million indigent persons in Florida and approximately $40,000 per lawyer for salary and benefits, the total costs for legal services lawyers would be $18.4 million. With an overhead of 40%, the minimum federal funding for Florida should be approximately $25.8 million. More realistic overhead costs place the total figure in the vicinity of $29 million. Return to text.

[36] See APPROPRIATION HISTORY, supra note 29, at 1-2 (illustrating that federal funding has declined from a high of $400 million in 1995). Return to text.

[37] See EQUAL JUSTICE IN THIS CENTURY, supra note 3, at 4. Return to text.

[38] See Arthur J. England & Russell E. Carlisle, History of Interest on Trust Accounts Program, FLA. B.J., Feb. 1982, at 101, 102. Return to text.

[39] See id. Return to text.

[40] See id. at 101. Return to text.

[41] See id. at 102-03. Return to text.

[42] See EQUAL JUSTICE IN THIS CENTURY, supra note 3, at 4. Indiana, the final state, has adopted the IOTA program, but the program is not yet operational. Return to text.

[43] See Matter of Interest on Trust Accounts, 538 So. 2d 448, 453 (Fla. 1989). Return to text.

[44] See FLORIDA IOTA REPORT, supra note 26, at vii (illustrating that IOTA's contribution as a percentage of Florida's total legal services funding rose from 10% in 1989 to 31% in 1993). Return to text.

[45] See id. at viii. This figure includes $10.2 million for general support of major programs and $1 million for special purpose grants. See id. at i. Return to text.

[46] See id. Return to text.

[47] See id. Ironically, the yield per state could decline with better technology since the program is dependent on the fact that administrative costs are too great to allow the client to gain the benefit of small amounts of interest. When technology reduces the administrative costs, lawyers have an ethical obligation to ensure that the interest on the clients' money is received by the clients. Of course, any decline in the interest rate hurts the IOTA program, and the interest yield has been on the decline. See also EQUAL JUSTICE IN THIS CENTURY, supra note 3, at 4; FLORIDA IOTA REPORT, supra note 26, at vii. Return to text.

[48] See infra Appendix 2. Return to text.

[49] See FLORIDA IOTA REPORT, supra note 26, at vii. With the decline in interest rates, it is particularly important to find ways to increase IOTA revenues. One way to increase IOTA revenue is to reform the process through which banks distribute money to IOTA programs. The Florida Bar Foundation has initiated such reform. On April 24, 1997, the Florida Supreme Court granted the petition of The Florida Bar Foundation seeking to amend Rule 5-1.1(e) of the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar (IOTA rule). See Amendments to Rules Regulating The Fla. Bar—Rule 5-1.1(e)—IOTA, 692 So. 2d 181, 181 (Fla. 1997). The purpose of the amendment is to increase revenue produced by the IOTA program. See id. at 181. The amendment authorizes the voluntary use of sweep accounts for normal or short-term trust funds as defined under the current IOTA rule. See id. A sweep account is a cash management product that electronically sweeps surplus funds out of a traditional checking account on a daily basis after all deposits, checks, and charges against the account are cleared. The surplus funds are placed into a higher yield investment, then electronically swept back into the traditional account before the start of the next business day. See id. at n.1. The amendment also stipulates the use of daily bank repurchase agreements as a higher-yield investment vehicle, limiting their use "to those financial institutions that carry the two highest levels of capitalization ratings from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation." Id. Return to text.

[50] See Amendments to Rules Regulating The Fla. Bar—1-3.1(a) and Rules of Judicial Administration—2.065 (Legal Aid), 598 So. 2d 44, 44 (Fla. 1992). Article I, section 21 of the Florida Constitution requires that "[t]he courts shall be open to every person for redress of any injury, and justice shall be administered without sale, denial or delay." FLA. CONST. art. I, § 21. Return to text.

[51] Amendments to Rules Regulating The Fla. Bar—1-3.1(a), 598 So. 2d at 44. Return to text.

[52] See THE FLA. BAR FOUND., THE REPORT OF THE FLORIDA JOINT COMMISSION ON THE DELIVERY OF LEGAL SERVICES TO THE INDIGENT (1991); see also Amendments to Rules Regulating The Fla. Bar—1-3.1(a), 598 So. 2d at 45. Return to text.

[53] See FLORIDA IOTA REPORT, supra note 26, at viii. Return to text.

[54] See THE FLA. BAR FOUND., FILING FEE ADD- ON INQUIRY 2-3 (1998) (on file with FLA. ST. U. L. REV., Tallahassee, Fla.). Return to text.

[55] In 1997, there were 1,602,965 county and circuit court filings. See Letter from Sybil Brown, Court Statistics Consultant, to Stephen Morse, Assistant to Talbot D'Alemberte, Jan. 12, 1998 2 (on file with FLA. ST. U. L. REV., Tallahassee, Fla.) [hereinafter S. Brown Letter]. Return to text.

[56] Inequities in public education are addressed in the same manner by providing extra state funding for the communities with greater poverty populations and limited local tax resources. Return to text.

[57] The number of appellate filings for 1997 was 22,823. See S. Brown Letter, supra note 55, at 2. Return to text.

[58] See In re Amendments to Rules Regulating The Florida Bar—1-3.1(a) and Rules of Judicial Administration—2.065 (Legal Aid), 598 So. 2d 41, 43 (Fla. 1992) (noting that "the right to counsel is no longer limited to criminal cases"). Return to text.

[59] See Keith Beyler & Ronald Spears, Funding Access to Civil Justice 34 (May 14, 1992) (unpublished manuscript presented at the Illinois State Bar Association's Allerton House Conference) (on file with author). A Civil Gideon Fund is a fund designed to help meet the legal needs of the poor. Return to text.

[60] See, e.g., Vicki L. Weber, Florida's Fleeting Sales Tax on Services, 15 FLA. ST. U. L. REV. 613, 614 (1987); Jackie Hallifax, Proposal to Lift Income-Tax Ban Defeated, SUN SENT., Jan. 28, 1998, at B6; Ban on Income Tax Won't Budge Once Again, ORLANDO SENT., Jan. 28, 1998, at D1. Return to text.

[61] See Weber, supra note 60, at 614. Return to text.

[62] Appropriate exceptions would be necessary, such as exempting legal fees for criminal defense. Return to text.

[63] See BUREAU OF ECON. AND BUS. RES., UNIV. OF FLA., 1994 FLORIDA STATISTICAL ABSTRACT 513 (1994) (noting that Florida legal services has generated $3.698 billion in fees). Return to text.

[64] See Beyler & Spears, supra note 59, at 35.

To ensure a proper apportionment between the private and public wrongs, the jury should apportion the punitive damages as part of its verdict, just as the jury now distributes compensatory damages between economic and non-economic loss. Specifically, the General Assembly should amend section 2-1109 on itemized verdicts to add the following sentence:
"In all cases where punitive damages are assessed by the jury, the verdict shall be itemized so as to reflect the monetary distribution between the amount necessary to punish the defendant for the private wrong done to the plaintiff personally and the amount necessary to punish the defendant for any harm or threatened harm to the public."; Then, in order to redirect the money to the Illinois Civil Gideon Fund, the General Assembly should replace the second paragraph of section 2-1207 on punitive damages with the following paragraph: "In cases where punitive damages are assessed, the amount assessed as necessary to punish the defendant for any harm or threatened harm to the public shall be deemed public property. The trial court shall award twenty percent of this amount to the plaintiff as compensation for vindicating the public's rights, and this award to the plaintiff shall be subject to any contingent fee contract with the plaintiff's attorney. The trial court shall direct payment of the other eighty percent to the Illinois Civil Gideon Fund. The trial court shall give notice to the Illinois Civil Gideon Fund of any punitive damage award in which it may have an interest and shall permit the Illinois Civil Gideon Fund to intervene when necessary to protect its interest in the punitive damage award." Id. Return to text.

[65] Id. at 36. Return to text.

[66] See FLA. STAT. § 768.73(2)(b) (1993), repealed by Act effective July 1, 1995, ch. 92-85, § 3, 1992 Fla. Laws 822. Sixty-five percent of the award was payable to the claimant. See id. If the cause of action was based on personal injury, the remaining 35% went to the Public Medical Assistance Trust Fund; otherwise, the remaining 35% went to the state's General Revenue Fund. See id. Return to text.

[67] See Beyler & Spears, supra note 59, at 31 (analyzing Illinois' legal needs in 1989). Return to text.

[68] Id. Return to text.

[69] Id. at 32. Return to text.

[70] See THE FLA. BAR & THE FLA. BAR FOUND., THE STANDING COMMITTEE ON PRO BONO SERVICES' REPORT TO THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA App. H (1996) [hereinafter 1996 FLORIDA PRO BONO SERVICES' REPORT]. Return to text.

[71] See In re Amendments to Rules Regulating The Fla. Bar—1-3.1(a), 598 So. 2d 41, 44 (Fla. 1992). Return to text.

[72] See id. Return to text.

[73] See id. at 42, 44. A federal magistrate and a federal judge have rejected the claim that mandatory reporting is a violation of an attorney's rights. See Thomas Rowe Schwarz v. Honorable Stephen H. Grimes, No. 94-40422-WS (N.D. Fla. Dec. 15, 1995); aff'd sub nom Thomas Rowe Schwarz v. Honorable Gerald Kogan, No. 94-40422-WS (N.D. Fla. Aug. 9, 1996). Return to text.

[74] See In re Amendments to Rules Regulating The Fla. Bar—1-3.1(a), 598 So. 2d at 44. Return to text.

[75] In 1994, Florida Bar members provided 806,874 hours of pro bono service and $1,518,781 to legal services organizations. See letter from Kent Spuhler, Executive Director, Florida Legal Services, Inc., to Talbot D'Alemberte, President, Florida State University 4 (Jan. 3, 1997) [hereinafter Spuhler Letter] (on file with FLA. ST. U. L. REV., Tallahassee, Fla.). In 1995, the number of hours of service and dollars contributed dropped slightly to 561,352 and $876,837 respectively. See id. at 3. In 1996, the numbers rebounded to 804,994 hours of service and $1,238,262 contributed. See id. at 2. Finally, in 1997, the number of hours of service and dollars contributed increased again to 842,304 hours and $1,427,263, which surpassed 1994's total hours of service and almost surpassed 1994's total dollar contributions. See letter from Barbara Brown, Assistant to Kent Spuhler, to Stephen Morse, Assistant to Talbot D'Alemberte 2 (Jan. 12, 1998) [hereinafter B. Brown Letter] [on file with FLA. ST. U. L. REV., Tallahassee, Fla.). Return to text.

[76] See Spuhler Letter, supra note 75, at 3. Return to text.

[77] See B. Brown Letter, supra note 75, at 2. Return to text.

[78] See Spuhler Letter, supra note 75, at 3 (illustrating that approximately 68% of non-deferred reporting attorneys contributed). Return to text.

[79] See B. Brown Letter, supra note 75, at 2 (illustrating that approximately 52% of non-deferred reporting attorneys contributed). Return to text.

[80] See 1996 FLORIDA PRO BONO SERVICES' REPORT, supra note 70, at 3 (attributing the drop in hours of service and dollars contributed after 1994 to more accurate reporting rather than less pro bono service). Return to text.

[81] Response to the Reply Brief of the Florida Bar at 4-5, Amendments to Rule 4-6.1 of the Rules Regulating the Florida Bar—Pro Bono Public Service, 696 So. 2d 734 (Fla. 1997) (No. 88-646). Return to text.

[82] See Amendments to Rules Regulating The Fla. Bar—1-3.1(a), 598 So. 2d 41, 55 (Fla. 1992) (Kogan, J., concurring in part, dissenting in part). Return to text.

[83] Id. Return to text.

[84] See id. at 54 (McDonald, J., concurring in part, dissenting in part). Return to text.

[85] Id. Return to text.

[86] See Gary Blankenship, Bar Asks Court for Voluntary Reporting, FLA. B. NEWS, June 1, 1996, at 3. Return to text.

[87] See id. at 1. The Board was deadlocked on this issue with each side receiving 21 votes. See id. The motion passed only after the president of the Bar voted in favor of the petition, thus breaking the tie. See id. Return to text.

[88] See Amendments to Rule 4-6.1 of the Rules Regulating the Florida Bar—Pro Bono Public Service, 696 So. 2d 734, 734 (Fla. 1997). Return to text.

[89] See id. at 734-35. Return to text.

[90] See id. at 738 (Grimes, J., dissenting). Return to text.

[91] See id. at 736-38 (Harding, Wells, JJ., concurring in part and dissenting in part). The Bar had not requested this action from the court and had not submitted any proposal to the court, but it had argued that difficulties in enforcement were a reason to displace the reporting rule. See id. at 738. Return to text.

[92] Id. at 737 (Wells, J., concurring in part and dissenting in part). Return to text.

[93] See Response to the Reply Brief of the Florida Bar, Amendments to Rule 4-6.1 of the Rules Regulating the Florida Bar—Pro Bono Public Service at 4-5, 696 So. 2d 734 (Fla. 1997) (No. 88-646). Return to text.

[94] See 1996 FLORIDA PRO BONO SERVICES' REPORT, supra note 70, at Apps. I-L (reprinting letters received by the Standing Committee on Pro Bono Services). Return to text.

[95] Id. at App. J (reprinting a letter from the Honorable Lucy Brown, Chair of the Fifteenth Judicial Circuit Pro Bono Committee). Return to text.

[96] See THE FLA. BAR & FLA. BAR FOUND., THE STANDING COMM. ON PRO BONO SERVICES' REPORT TO THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA 13-14 (1995) [hereinafter 1995 FLORIDA PRO BONO SERVICES' REPORT]. Return to text.

[97] See By-Laws of the Tallahassee Bar Ass'n, Inc., art. III, § 2 (1991), stating in pertinent part:

No natural person shall be eligible for election to regular membership unless he or she . . . agrees to participate in the legal aid program operated by the Legal Aid Foundation, Inc., or alternative forms of legal aid service approved by the Board of Directors, and who agrees to abide by the By-Laws of this association.
It is important to note that while the By-Laws of the Tallahassee Bar Association do provide for certain exceptions to this requirement, such as judges and judicial clerks, they do not provide a buy-out provision. See id. Return to text.

[98] See By-Laws of Orange County Bar Ass'n, Inc., art. II, § 4(B) (1991) (providing that "[t]he Executive Council, by majority vote of all members, may terminate the membership of any member of this Association for . . . [u]njustified failure of refusal to accept Legal Aid Referral cases"). Return to text.

[99] According to the Florida Bar Association, as of January 1998, 3444 attorneys were practicing in Orange County. See THE FLORIDA BAR, CUSTOMER FILE LISTING: MIGS BY COUNTY 3 (Jan. 1998) (on file with FLA. ST. U. L. REV., Tallahassee, Fla.). Approximately 73% (2500) were members of the Orange County Bar Association. See letter from Kimberly Dormois, Administrative Assistant, Orange County Bar Association, to Stephen Morse, Assistant to Talbot D'Alemberte 1 (Jan. 28, 1998) (on file with FLA. ST. U. L. REV., Tallahassee, Fla.). Return to text.

[100] In 1996, 929 members of the Orange County Bar Association paid the buy-out option, whereas 916 attorneys accepted legal aid cases. See LEGAL AID SOCIETY OF THE ORANGE COUNTY BAR ASSN., 1996 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PRO BONO PROGRAM 3 (1996). Three hundred and nine members chose to participate in pro bono related activities such as the Homeless Advocacy Project, Telephone Screening, Citizen Dispute Settlement or the Community Education Project. See id. Return to text.

[101] See HAWAII STATE BAR ASS'N, 1997 ATTORNEY REGISTRATION STATEMENT 3 (1997) [hereinafter 1997 HAWAII BAR REPORT]; Telephone Interview with Julie Oliver, Executive Director, Texas Lawyers Care-Pro Bono and Legal Services Support Project of the State Bar of Texas (June 4, 1997) [hereinafter Oliver Interview]. Return to text.

[102] See 1997 HAWAII BAR REPORT, supra note 101; Oliver Interview, supra note 101. Return to text.

[103] See 1997 HAWAII BAR REPORT, supra note 101. Return to text.

[104] See Press Release from the Hawaii State Bar Ass'n, Ellen Godbey Carson, Pres. (Feb. 20, 1996) (reporting that Hawaii's attorneys provided over $5,000,000 in legal services to the poor) (on file with author). Return to text.

[105] See STATE BAR OF TEX., PRO BONO REPORTING: JUNE 1995 THROUGH MAY 1996 1 (1996). Return to text.

[106] See The Comm. on Pro Bono and Legal Serv., Proposal to the Chief Judge Judith Kaye for an Attorney Pro Bono Requirement, in 52 THE RECORD OF THE ASSOCIATION OF THE BAR OF NEW YORK 367, 368-69 (1997). Return to text.

[107] See id. at 369. Return to text.

[108] See id. at 367. Return to text.

[109] See infra Appendix 3. However, some of the reported pro bono efforts by lawyers licensed in Florida may actually be performed in other states. Return to text.

[110] I ALEXIS DE TOCQUEVILLE, DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA 276 (Phillips Bradley ed. & Harry Reeve trans., 1945) (1835). Return to text.

[111] 1995 FLORIDA PRO BONO SERVICES' REPORT, supra note 96, at 7-8. There has also been significant activity in the federal courts. For example, the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida created the Volunteer Lawyers' Project for the Southern District of Florida, a pro bono program that finds legal counsel for indigent litigants with meritorious claims. See Response in Opposition to the Florida Bar's Petition at 8, Amendment to Rule 4-6.1 of the Rules Regulating the Florida Bar—Pro Bono Public Service, 696 So. 2d 734 (Fla. 1996) (No. 88-646). Through this program more than 700 attorneys have agreed to accept cases. See id Return to text.